The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Future Work TEASER 3

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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 10: Musician

#61 Post by Thallium » Sat Jun 02, 2018 4:17 pm

Part 11 of the Illustrated Guide. This time we will be looking at the apothecary, a battlefield healer who hopes to keep the soldiers under his care on this side of the afterlife. Those of you who have browsed Tom's older Deviantart pages may recognise this image, I decided I liked his design for the basitin doctor so much that I would try and emulate it, with some minor alterations, into the style of the Illustrated Guide. I'll let you tell me whether I have been successful or not. Next up we come to the last of the "normal" images in this series, the cataphract, a mountain of armour that rides around the battlefield before crashing with the force of a tidal wave into enemy formations. After that, things are going to be... a little different for the final push to the end. Enjoy!

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A hardy and stoic people, basitins are famed throughout the world for their stamina, stubbornness and their complete inability to know when to just lie down and die. Part of this is psychological: basitins are conditioned from birth to be soldiers and sent away to train with the military after their twelfth birthday, however much of it is physiological as well. Their muscle fibres contract and relax using less energy than a human's or keidran's do which contributes to their great endurance and their vascular system is interspersed with powerful valves that can detect a localised drop in pressure and constrict, slowing rate of blood loss from a catastrophic injury and making it more likely they will be able to survive. Nevertheless, despite these and numerous other adaptions, sometimes a basitin takes more damage then their body can handle, especially on a battlefield, and that is where the apothecaries of the Royal Military Medical Corps step into the fray.

Usually comprised of former soldiers who are too injured to fight on the front lines anymore, the apothecaries provide what medical attention they can to hopefully prevent their comrades from suffering the same fate as themselves. This includes bandaging and stitching wounds, preparing poultices to relieve pain and prevent infection, brewing potions, oils and decoctions to attenuate all sorts of maladies, setting broken bones and, if there is nothing else do be done, amputations and assisted suicides. The act of euthanising their compatriots who after suffering terrible injuries would rather die then live on as a cripple is a sacred task permissible to be carried out only by the apothecaries. If a soldier should choose this option, the act is executed by the use of a conical metal spike, about 25 cm long, placed underneath the jaw and then driven up through the base of the skull and into the brain, killing the wounded warrior instantly. Death by this method affords the soldier the same honour they would have received had they died on the field of battle: their name inscribed forever in gold upon one of the great black marble monoliths that reside within the Hall of Glory. The highest honour a basitin can achieve in their life.

Apothecaries operate behind their own battle lines and so are not equipped for combat, instead wearing a simple blood-red tunic and trousers with a long white coat to designate their job as a healer and, if necessary, an angel of death. One of the most unusual pieces of their clothing however is the blindfolds which they wear at all times when patients start being brought to them not long after battle commences. Basitins are fiercely private creatures, reflected in the draconian decency laws which are enforced on their island home. These laws have had such a strong impact on basitin psyche over the generations that even a soldier in the throws of agony would baulk at the thought of being exposed to someone in the course of their treatment, even a person trying to save their life. To counteract this aversion (and because they are legally required to), apothecaries blindfold themselves so that they cannot see their patient's indecency and instead rely on touch, sound, scent and often the patients own strangled cries of pain to locate and treat whatever injury lies before them. Apothecaries have an additional weapon in their medical arsenal from an rather unexpected source: mice. The Medical Corps specially train these creatures to be able to sniff out infection and other malaises, whereupon they return to their handlers and guide them through a combination of squeaks and tugs to the affected site. This role has gained the mice the nickname of "eyes" amongst the soldiers with many a wounded man joking that even if the apothecaries couldn't see them, their "eyes" would soon be able to tell them if the prognosis was good or bad.

Healing ones comrades may not be quite as glorious as killing ones enemies and it is unlikely that many ballads or songs will be written about the apothecaries fighting on the thin red line, nevertheless it is a job that makes a real difference, enabling those stricken in battle to maybe return and fight once more or provide a glorious end to those who are not so fortunate. For an apothecary, many of whom were once the ones on the operating table themselves, this purpose is enough and they go about their grisly business with the same courage and discipline as the most stalwart soldiers. Death is glorious, but life is glorious too
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 11: Apothecary

#62 Post by Thallium » Sat Jun 09, 2018 2:06 pm

Part 12 of the Illustrated Guide. Today we will be looking at the second of the two major cavalry types: the cataphract, a hammer meant to smash aside all opposition with enough armour to be extremely difficult to bring down. These guys are probably as close to traditional knights as basitins come and it was very satisfying being able to draw all the armour for this guy.

And so we come to a turning point; the guide carries on for a little while longer but next week you will notice that things are going to be a little different. Same style and all, just a change of tack and for that reason I'm not going to say what next week's piece is going to be. Should be an interesting surprise I think. On that note, if this thread gets to 2,000 views, I'll release a final 3D teaser before the actual 3D uploads start in a little while's time. Enjoy!

Any problems viewing these images, you can find them mirrored on my FA: http://www.furaffinity.net/user/thallium/

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A basitin army is sometimes known, by friends and foe alike, as the glittering host. As so many of the soldiers under their banner are armoured head to toe in steel, when the light of a brilliant summer day shines down upon the throng it is reflected in a thousand polished helms, curiasses and weapons to give the assembly an almost gem-like quality to any observing or unfortunate enough to be standing against them. Amongst the assembled congregation, there is none more armoured and more glittering in the common soldiery then the cataphracts, living mountains of castle-forged steel that, while slow by cavalry standards, hit with a hammer blow that can send even the most stalwart of opponents reeling. The second major type of cavalry unit employed by the basitin military, the cataphracts, like their lighter counterparts the lancers, are usually recruited from amongst those basitins with prior experience with horses to make caring for their chargers on the march easier and to reduce the training required to teach prospective soldiers how to ride into battle. While those recruits of lighter builds tend to gravitate towards the lancers, those of more stout and strong physique usually congregate within the ranks of the cataphracts; all the better to bear the heavy armour and weapons with which they are equipped.

Cataphracts are the most heavily armoured of the basitin soldiery, excluding senior officers. While their equipment is mostly of the standard pattern worn by most soldiers, it has some notable extra pieces not found within the armouries of other regiments. These are: a bevour to cover the neck and lower jaw, couters to protect the elbows, gauntlets with additional finger plates and cuisses to defend the thighs (the tassets usually attached to a standard pattern curiasses have been removed to accommodate the cuisses). The riders also carry the same large kite shield used by shieldbearers as well as a longer version of the shieldbearer's standard weapon, the burrick. Their mounts are similarly armoured with additions from the pattern worn by the lancers including a criniere guarding the horse's neck on the front and back as well as a croupiere for the defence of the hind quarters. All this extra armoured protection is required in order for the cataphracts to perform their function on the battlefield: a tidal wave that crushes all opposition.

Whereas the lancers are a shock cavalry: designed to do their damage on the charge before wheeling out and thundering back in again without ever stopping, the cataphracts on the other hand are utilised more like mounted infantry: smashing into enemy formations like a hammer blow and then staying put to finish the fight in melee. This tactic is used to counter one of the great weaknesses of a basitin army, the fact that it is very slow. The heavy armour and emphasis on formation for most infantry types makes it difficult to quickly exploit gaps or hurriedly reinforce isolated sections of the battlefield, a deficiency that has cost the basitins more then a few battles in the past. Hence the cataphracts were specifically designed to offset this, almost like a mounted greatsword, employing the speed of the horse to quickly manoeuvre them across the battlefield and the weight of armour to protect them even in fierce, un-moving combat where cavalry are traditionally extremely vulnerable. While primarily used in their mounted role, cataphracts are also trained to fight dismounted in case their steed is killed or the ground dictates that horses are more of a hindrance than a help.

While being a relatively recent addition to the basitin's military roster, the cataphracts have nevertheless proved their worth in numerous battles since their introduction. While the majority of basitin cavalry are lancers, having the support of the super-heavy cataphracts in key areas against infantry or other cavalry is invaluable as they simply refuse to die. It takes a particularly obstinate and fearless type of basitin to want to join their ranks as they will often be sent where the fighting is at its thickest or most dire, even going so far as to charge enemy spear formations head on, trusting to their armour to keep them alive in order to break through to assist trapped comrades or deal the hammer blow needed to break an enemies resistance entirely. They have been so successful in fact that there is talk in the upper echelons of the basitin military command of expanding their numbers as well as rolling out the additional cataphract-pattern armour pieces to other soldier types, starting with the greatswords, to see if the extra survivability they afford is worth the extra cost of manufacture. It is clear that as the rest of the races move towards magic as their most powerful weapon of war, the basitins will have to respond in kind to counter this threat. They may not have magic themselves but they have their ingenuity and the impetus to survive and if cladding every soldier on the battlefield in more armour then even the wealthiest of human knights is what it takes to win, then that is exactly what they will do.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 12: Cataphract

#63 Post by Technic[Bot] » Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:38 am

Thallium wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 4:17 pm
-Bloody snip-
Ah those civil war medic vibes are strong. In any case the last thing you want to see as a medic, or as a patient reall,y is your doctor covered in blood. In movies and games we are used to see the pools of blood around, that is just dramatic effect:
You can't "chop" comfortably if everything is swimming in red there is a lot of care taken, at least in modern medicine, to have an orderly and clean procedure. Sure is a field hospital but if the doctors look like these i imagine euthanasia is the most common procedure...
Speaking of that, your description was awfully detailed, did you come up with it by yourself or were you inspired by something. Also I am not sure a normal arm would be capable of puncturing the skull. You would need a press or a hammer for that.
There is also a fine line between honor and pride, heroism and arrogance and these guys seem to walk dangerously on the wrong side.
Also his right arm looks a bit off
Thallium wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 2:06 pm
-Armored horse snip-
Now that is mechanized infantry, well not really but with that much steel... You get my point.
I am not sure if the whole, "pick people used to horses" would work here a draft horse is a different beast than the now "almost" extinct military/police horses. Those animals were breed specifically to fight, its behavior and upkeep would be different than your regular farm horse. The thing with domestic animals is that they were selectively breed to perform a job to peak potential to the point some thoroughly breed horses/dogs can't do much else than why they were bred for. In any case is any specific training required to be a cataphract? You know, be a lancer first then a shield carrier then you can apply? Or you just have to sign in the "cataphract" queue at the academy? Also do they have area of attack like in AoE II?

In terms of the drawing the horse perspective is on point, it is extremely easy to make them look like oversized ponies. An the armor is cool, but the legs are a bit unprotected. They are begging to be impaled or shot by some good old fashioned Spanish Tercios. Also probably is the perspective but the rider look a bit fat and his legs seems too thin and left arm looks a bit inconsistent with his chest.
In any case is a pretty good damn good basitin horsemen.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 12: Cataphract

#64 Post by Thallium » Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:57 pm

Technic[Bot] wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:38 am
Speaking of that, your description was awfully detailed, did you come up with it by yourself or were you inspired by something. Also I am not sure a normal arm would be capable of puncturing the skull. You would need a press or a hammer for that.
There is also a fine line between honor and pride, heroism and arrogance and these guys seem to walk dangerously on the wrong side.
Also his right arm looks a bit off
I used what Tom wrote when he originally did this piece as a starting guide (usually former soldiers too injured to fight, mercy killing granting full honour etc.) but then fleshed it out as usual to give extra details. The basitin physiology part was me trying to come up with an actual physical answer to the question of why basitins are so much tougher than other races and I thought those were a few things that might make sense, knowing what I do about molecular biology.

Hmm maybe I should add a bit about a hammer; my thought was that it might be possible to do by hand because the base of skull is weaker than the front but I'm not sure how feasible that is still.

Can you describe how the arm looks off? It looks okay to me but then when you've been staring at something so long you rather lose perspective (haha) on how it looks to other people.
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:38 am
I am not sure if the whole, "pick people used to horses" would work here a draft horse is a different beast than the now "almost" extinct military/police horses. Those animals were breed specifically to fight, its behavior and upkeep would be different than your regular farm horse. The thing with domestic animals is that they were selectively breed to perform a job to peak potential to the point some thoroughly breed horses/dogs can't do much else than why they were bred for. In any case is any specific training required to be a cataphract? You know, be a lancer first then a shield carrier then you can apply? Or you just have to sign in the "cataphract" queue at the academy? Also do they have area of attack like in AoE II?
I agree with you about the differences between work horses and war horses but I still think that someone used to the former would still have an advantage with the latter over some city boy who's never been near one in their lives. I was more thinking about care and maintenance then riding anyway as basitin cavalry have no squires to do the grunt work for them.

In terms of cavalry types, I was thinking that the basitin military would work like a modern army where you get choice about where you want to go (within reason) and so comparing a cataphract to a lancer might be like comparing, say, a paratrooper to a normal infantry soldier in the modern world. I.e. the cataphracts might be seen as a more "hardcore" option for those nutjobs who really want to push themselves without quite being special forces (that's where the Du'hadrin and the Akorshakai come in), but you don't have to have done the "lesser" role before you can enlist in the "greater" one.
I was thinking more Rome: Total War with these guys in mind. Those damn Persians...
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:38 am
In terms of the drawing the horse perspective is on point, it is extremely easy to make them look like oversized ponies. An the armor is cool, but the legs are a bit unprotected. They are begging to be impaled or shot by some good old fashioned Spanish Tercios. Also probably is the perspective but the rider look a bit fat and his legs seems too thin and left arm looks a bit inconsistent with his chest.
In any case is a pretty good damn good basitin horsemen.
You know, I always thought the same about horse's legs and I looked and looked and looked for historical examples of horse leg armour and as far as I can tell it just didn't exist. The only tenuous examples I could find were on ceremonial armour rather than battle armour and so I decided to just go with the examples of history and just not give them any. I think the reason for this (as far as I could glean from various websites) is that horses really can't run very well when they have extra weight on their legs, or maybe chaffing or something like that. I also think it has something to do with cavalry's traditional historical role in battle which was, primarily, to destroy the enemy's cavalry and then just run amok in their back lines where there is little resistance. Therefore maybe the reason ancient knights didn't armour their horse's legs is because, as they were mostly fighting other mounted knights, they just didn't need to.

I think the fatness comes from the way his curiass is bowed outwards and the fact that you can't see the edge because the saddle's in the way. It's the same curiass as all the other guys have worn. I see about the leg, maybe that's always been a weakness of how I've drawn it and now its just been made more obvious by the horse. The left arm is always a challenge for me whenever I have to draw one that's held in tight against the curiass, I never quite know how to draw it properly (see also my longbowman for the exact same problem). Fortunately 3D does all the perspective work for me! Can't wait to start showing you guys that.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 12: Cataphract

#65 Post by Technic[Bot] » Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:57 am

Thallium wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:57 pm
Hmm maybe I should add a bit about a hammer; my thought was that it might be possible to do by hand because the base of skull is weaker than the front but I'm not sure how feasible that is still.

Can you describe how the arm looks off? It looks okay to me but then when you've been staring at something so long you rather lose perspective (haha) on how it looks to other people.
What you want to do is destroy the base of the brain. That is where the heart and the lungs are controlled and that way you disconnect the whole system and thus no more pain. So maybe if you get creative you can puncture through the throat
and in between the column to get there, but that is a bit complicated...
Also the hammers gives you an advantage: Is faster, the last thing you want while doing that is struggling to punch through the skull of your fallen comrade because he is too thick-headed.
In case of the arm: His right arm looks quite shorter than his left, at least for me, since it is occluded by his glove.
Thallium wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:57 pm
I agree with you about the differences between work horses and war horses but I still think that someone used to the former would still have an advantage with the latter over some city boy who's never been near one in their lives. I was more thinking about care and maintenance then riding anyway as basitin cavalry have no squires to do the grunt work for them.

In terms of cavalry types, I was thinking that the basitin military would work like a modern army where you get choice about where you want to go (within reason) and so comparing a cataphract to a lancer might be like comparing, say, a paratrooper to a normal infantry soldier in the modern world. I.e. the cataphracts might be seen as a more "hardcore" option for those nutjobs who really want to push themselves without quite being special forces (that's where the Du'hadrin and the Akorshakai come in), but you don't have to have done the "lesser" role before you can enlist in the "greater" one.
I was thinking more Rome: Total War with these guys in mind. Those damn Persians...
My point was that you could not hope to pick a farm boy and expect him to handle a war horse with the same ease as his plow pony. You need someone to spend years working with this specialized breed, to do that specialized job.
Sure your local cowboy would have a leg up on that front but he won't have time to do much farming after enlisting.
Thallium wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:57 pm
You know, I always thought the same about horse's legs and I looked and looked and looked for historical examples of horse leg armour and as far as I can tell it just didn't exist. The only tenuous examples I could find were on ceremonial armour rather than battle armour and so I decided to just go with the examples of history and just not give them any. I think the reason for this (as far as I could glean from various websites) is that horses really can't run very well when they have extra weight on their legs, or maybe chaffing or something like that. I also think it has something to do with cavalry's traditional historical role in battle which was, primarily, to destroy the enemy's cavalry and then just run amok in their back lines where there is little resistance. Therefore maybe the reason ancient knights didn't armour their horse's legs is because, as they were mostly fighting other mounted knights, they just didn't need to.
I once saw "historical" barding that consisting on "a curtain" chain mail over the horses legs. Keeps their legs protected from arrows and guys smart enough to hack at their hooves. Not much to protect against charging a pike formation thought.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 12: Cataphract

#66 Post by Thallium » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:49 pm

Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:57 am
In case of the arm: His right arm looks quite shorter than his left, at least for me, since it is occluded by his glove.
Ah I see it, the elbow needs to be dropped a bit to get it to line up with the other arm. Noted.
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:57 am
Sure your local cowboy would have a leg up on that front but he won't have time to do much farming after enlisting.
Now I want to see a basitin cowboy, lol.
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:57 am
I once saw "historical" barding that consisting on "a curtain" chain mail over the horses legs. Keeps their legs protected from arrows and guys smart enough to hack at their hooves. Not much to protect against charging a pike formation thought.
Yeah it seems to be a choice of either scale armour covering the whole horse (including some leg protection) or plate armour without leg protection. I haven't been able to find examples with crossover, I guess people must of had their reasons.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 12: Cataphract

#67 Post by Thallium » Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:21 pm

Part 13 of the Illustrated Guide. Well I promised something a little different in this one and I think you'll agree that this is definitely a little different. Not too much to say other than it was an extremely nice change of pace to put armour behind me for a little while and draw something very contrasting. Next week will follow the theme of large changes in era but this time in the opposite direction, going back far into the distant past to have a look at what a basitin soldier looked like during the Contact Wars when they first left their island home.

If the idea of basitins in a modern setting tickles your fancy, you can check out the entire book I wrote about that very subject: "The Art of War" which you can find in my signature or at viewtopic.php?f=5&t=13854%5Bimg

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Sixty-six years have passed since humans first made contact with an intelligent alien species. It was not quite how they imagined it would go. For a world still in the early stages of recovering from the most devastating war in human history, the arrival of hundreds of thousands of alien refugees in the space of three weeks through a portal into a field in southern England was very almost too much to bear. To this day, no one quite knows how the authorities on our side of the rift were able to anticipate this mass exodus; all we know is that one day, without warning, the army placed a cordon around a significant part of the Wiltshire countryside with express orders not to let anyone in. Or out. Then from the dark, they came; thousands upon thousands of people, furred with long ears and a tail but people none the less, streaming from a great rent in reality that pulsed with ethereal energy. Day and night they came, a never-ending procession of people carrying all they owned on their backs; orderly and disciplined but visibly frightened and ill at ease. The soldiers guarding the inner ring of the cordon could only gape in wonder at the sight before them, they had been expecting War of the Worlds yet those that stood before them now were clearly civilians dressed in clothes from hundreds of years ago. At the start of the third week, the makeup of the refugees changed, with civilians giving way to armoured warriors, bloodied and battle scarred with broken weapons and defeat in their eyes. The guards were once again nervous about these new arrivals but orders came from above that these warriors meant no harm and were fleeing just like the others. Then, quite suddenly, the great rent in the air changed. It began to thrum, convulse and flicker and, just before it was extinguished with a sonic boom and a flash of light, a last, lone figure stepped through before the portal closed forever. He was armoured like many of the others but in black steel with gold trim and he had draped around his shoulders a crimson cloak that was torn and stained. His name was Keith Cornelius Keiser and he was the last of their race to make it out alive.

The basitins, for that was their name, were fleeing a great enemy; humans much like those that now stood open-mouthed before them but wielders of magic and with a distinct genocidal edge to their purpose. These “Templars” wanted conquest and they were not above putting all who resisted to the sword. The basitins were a warrior people, proud and strong with great martial prowess on the field of battle. But they had no magic and when the Templars arrived in force on the shores of the basitin’s island home, all that skill and military might merely slowed the Templars down instead of stopping them. Those in the high command of the basitin military were left with two choices: either they could stand and fight to the last as they always had, or they could flee, abandon all they had stood for over the centuries and run with their tails between their legs. For many nights the debate raged with raised voices and occasional outbursts of physical violence. At first it was many against a few: of course they would stand and fight and die, how could there even be debate about this? But slowly the mood began to change, propagated primarily by one of the three surviving High Generals, Ambassador General Keiser. After all, what was the point of dying with honour when there was no one left to remember their sacrifice? Eventually the decision was made, the basitins would evacuate their island and flee, but where could they go? This is the part where history gets hazy. As the basitins could not use magic themselves, the construction of a portal to another world must have been the work of someone else, probably a Templar who did not see eye to eye with his brethren. But why Earth and not somewhere else in their world? And how did the UK government know to expect them? These and many more questions still linger when considering those fateful days when the basitins first arrived; but the basitin high command never told and nor did the British government of the time. Now, with the recent death of Marcus Kaine, the last surviving member of the basitin high command, it looks like such questions will be forever lost to time.

In the weeks and months during and immediately after the portal opened, British service personnel furiously built a tented city with the help of soldiers and equipment flown in from all nations, including the basitins themselves. It was cramped and it was basic but it was safe and in it the remnants of the basitin race lived for the next 26 years. The question of what to do with them raged in the parliaments and congresses of all nations for decades, especially in the British government who housed them within their borders with the help of aid sent from all over the world. Debate roared back and forth continually until, with great hesitation, it was accepted that the basitins clearly weren’t going anywhere and that they couldn’t be kept cooped up in their internment camp forever. The only option left was one that sent chills down everyone’s spine. Integration. Over the course of the next few decades, basitins were gradually released from the camp and housed within society at large. Most stayed in Britain but many went to other nations who would accept them, western Europe and north America primarily. It was not an easy or painless process but the basitins had learned much of their human hosts during their time imprisoned and, furthermore, were under direct order from the by then late General Keiser to accept this new reality and integrate as best they could. All things considered it was a remarkable success with levels of violence, delinquency and other cultural clashes significantly below that predicted by experts. Soon basitins were present in work places, in hospitals and in schools and in all the places one found their human counterparts. However the one place that took basitins the longest to be allowed into was also the one they most desired: the military.

To date, the British military is the only armed force that has allowed basitins to serve within its ranks and even there it took a lot of back and forth before the decision was made. Partly this was a political issue: the general public and military brass were understandably concerned about giving aliens guns and teaching them how to fight in modern war but it was also a logistical issue. Basitins, while similar in many respects to humans physically are different in enough ways that several pieces of equipment had to be modified to fit them, primarily boots and helmets and this caused extra strain on the military’s supply chain. Fortunately however the will was there and in the late 90s the first basitin recruits passed out of the army training centres at Harrogate, Pirbright, Winchester, Catterick and Sandhurst. They saw action for the first time in the 2003 invasion of Iraq where they distinguished themselves as exceptional soldiers; tireless, disciplined and capable, everything one would expect given their martial history. So successful were they in fact that in 2009 the order was given to create a basitin-only infantry regiment to serve alongside their brothers already in existing units. This corps was expected to operate far above the standards expected for normal infantry soldiers; somewhere on par with the Parachute Regiment or the Royal Marines but without the veil of secrecy that surrounded special forces like the SAS. The name chosen for this regiment was the “Du’hadrin”, a moniker that had its origins in an elite cadre of bodyguards responsible for guarding senior officers, generals and the like on the ancient battlefields of the basitin’s homeland. Name thus chosen, the last thing to do was select a symbol to serve as a cap badge and also to emblazon upon the flags surrounding their new regimental headquarters at Credenhill near Hereford. The choice here was obvious: the Illyrion Rosette, the crook and sword symbol that had served as the sigil of the Eastern Basitin state (where most of the survivors had come from) and had become the de facto symbol of the basitin people as a whole.

The Du’hadrin are a shining example of the tenacity and indomitable will of the basitin people. From inter-dimensional refugees relying on handouts in a strange and frightening new world to asserting their rightful place at the top of the military food chain all within one lifetime, it is no surprise that basitins, and the Du’hadrin especially, are respected, sometimes grudgingly, across conflict zones the world over. From major wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to smaller operations where they serve as advisers and trainers along with other British and international military personnel, the Du’hadrin show just how right those politicians and military higher-ups were in the 90s that finally enabled the basitins to take up arms once again. The style of warfare may have drastically changed but a basitin will always find themselves at home on a battlefield.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 13: Du'hadrin officer

#68 Post by Thallium » Wed Jun 20, 2018 6:01 pm

Final teaser image for some of the work I'll be doing once the current run of 2D images ends. The basitins are magnificent fighters and their heroism and bravery are unmatched in the known world. However, not every battle goes their way...

Any problems viewing this image, you can find it mirrored on my FA: http://www.furaffinity.net/user/thallium/ (in the scraps folder).

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What I cannot create, I do not understand.
The imagination of nature is far, far greater than the imagination of man.

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