The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 4: Signaller

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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 3: Marine

#16 Post by Technic[Bot] » Mon Apr 09, 2018 3:31 am

Thallium wrote:
Sun Apr 08, 2018 9:13 am
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Sun Apr 08, 2018 4:34 am
The marine looks a bit weird. It strikes me as simplified samurai armor for some reason. Not a critic in any way just a comment.
On more curious cultural notes. The buckler and helmet remind me of spanish Rodeleros. soldier armed with short-sword and bucklers. Basically light infantry.
In any case I would not like to be in the wrong side of a Basitian boarding.
I know what you mean about it looking slightly odd, it's the juxtaposition between metal and leather armour I think. I wanted to do something slightly different for this one and having some realistic leather armour seemed like an appropriate choice given their role. If you do have any criticisms, feel free to share them as I'd like to improve things as much as I can.

The lamellar style of armour was worn by many cultures in both east and west and in both metal and leather construction, however you're right, it's most famous usage was in samurai armour. This particular curiass was based of a viking one (seemed appropriate). This is probably the most "fantasy" these pieces get as while leather armour was a thing, it has been tarnished somewhat by it's unrealistic portrayal in movies and video games. All the rest of the pictures will return to metal armour, with one piece in particular which displays a very nice historical complete suit.

I like the look of those Rodeleros, if I ever decided to advance this into Mekkan's future, that might be one of the designs I'd choose.
What i mean is that i do not like to criticize people work when specially when i have no skills in their area (drawing as in this case) of expertise.

The only other type of lamellar armor i knew was the roman lorica segmentata and a wierd chinesse armor made of paper. But as you point out most people knowledge about historical arms and armor comes from tv and movies. Or in my case playing too much Age of Empries on my teens.

Well Rodeleros, or Sword and Blucker men, are not particulary recent. Cortéz conquered Tenochtitlan using mostly Bucklermen in 1521, and I always pictured Mekkan to be in its late 1400's, so yeah maybe some Basitian Conquistador would not be soo out of place.
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 3: Marine

#17 Post by Thallium » Mon Apr 09, 2018 4:38 pm

Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Apr 09, 2018 3:31 am
What i mean is that i do not like to criticize people work when specially when i have no skills in their area (drawing as in this case) of expertise.

The only other type of lamellar armor i knew was the roman lorica segmentata and a wierd chinesse armor made of paper. But as you point out most people knowledge about historical arms and armor comes from tv and movies. Or in my case playing too much Age of Empries on my teens.

Well Rodeleros, or Sword and Blucker men, are not particulary recent. Cortéz conquered Tenochtitlan using mostly Bucklermen in 1521, and I always pictured Mekkan to be in its late 1400's, so yeah maybe some Basitian Conquistador would not be soo out of place.
Hah, I too know most of my history of William Wallace, Joan of Arc, Genghis Khan, Saladin, Barbarossa and Cortéz from AoE II; ah the memories. I do delve a little bit into different time periods during this series. I have one image that tries to show a typical basitin soldier from a hundred or so years ago (comic time) and a few more that show them in modern military equipment (our time), although we won't get to those for a while yet. There's literally an infinite number of basitins that I could of and wanted to draw but eventually I had to say enough was enough and stop with what I had (16 in all), though I'm not ruling out maybe doing some more in the future (including a very special project which I'm hoping will have come to fruition by the time this run of images finishes).
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 3: Marine

#18 Post by Thallium » Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:55 pm

Part 4 of the Illustrated Guide. Today we'll be having a look at the signaller, a soldier who enables that most vital of battlefield functions: communication, and additionally serves as their unit's standard bearer. I had lots of fun with this one designing and finding symbols to use on the banner as well as trying to figure out an alphabet for use on the war horn (which is readable by the way though you might have to zoom in a bit, internet points for anyone who can tell me what it says). Up next will be one of my favourites: the lancer, the first of the basitin cavalry we will be looking at. Enjoy!

Any problems viewing these images, you can find them mirrored on my FA: http://www.furaffinity.net/user/thallium/

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There are many aspects of the basitin military that make it the envy of the known world and one of the foremost amongst them is its highly trained signaller corps. Communications, as any student of military history will tell you, is by far one of the most important and yet often overlooked facets of a military campaign, with those commanders recognising its importance being rewarded with success which those who neglect it being punished with defeat. Knowing where your own men are and what they are doing is equally as important as knowing where and what the enemy is doing and it is this problem which the high generals of almost a century ago sought to overcome when they created the Royal Corps of Signals. Recruiting from those soldiers who even by basitin standards have exceptional hearing, the RCS's mission is to enable a commander to keep in touch with their troops over large distances on a battle field and vice versa. This is achieved by the use of war horns upon which can be blown a series of notes that correspond to words or phrases. There are almost a hundred "pre-defined" or "quick" phrases that a signaller needs to know by heart, including the call to charge, retreat, turn about and double time and should none of these suffice, the signaller can also spell words out phonetically to enable the communication of even complex tactical information across great distances. Messages are typically passed signaller to signaller who then translate and relay them orally to their intended recipients. As such, ordinary soldiers are not required to recognise the entire lexicon, however they are expected to be able to distinguish those calls which have a direct impact on them in the battle ("halt", "enemy behind" etc.).

Signallers are attached to various units in the army with the company being the smallest detachment to receive its own signaller, typically the most junior members of the Corps. Above them are battalion, brigade and division signallers, each more senior then the last and with a bigger war horn to allow them to communicate across the increasingly larger distances. These soldiers serve as intermediaries, collecting messages from those below them and passing on those that need to go up the chain. Last of all is the Magno Audientium who serves the general and his bodyguard and through which all of the general's battlefield commands are issued. In the case of company signallers (as shown here), they stand behind the company with the optio, the second in command, from where they can observe any developments they need to make their superior aware of and listen for any specific or general orders coming from above that they need to tell the optio or the marshal, commanding, about.

Signallers also serve another important function within their assigned units, that of the standard bearer. In days gone by, this function was served by a specially selected member of the detachment and was rotated through different soldiers as a great honour and reward for impressive feats in battle. With the creation of the RCS however, this practise was retired and the signallers became the permanent standard bearers, a function which still carries great prestige. Attached via a mounting point forged directly into the back of their cuirass to enable the soldier to carry both their weapon and their war horn at the same time, the standard is approximately the same height as the carrier and serves as both an identifier of the company/battalion/brigade/division as well as displaying the honours that unit has accrued over sometimes centuries of service. The banner of the company signaller shown here shows at the top the Illyrion Rosette, the crook and sword symbol that serves as the sigil of the Eastern Basitin state. Below that is the company's identifying number, in this case "14", a point of great pride and much good natured inter-unit rivalry for the soldiers who fight under it. The crimson lower half of the banner identifies the company in question as being a Shieldbearer company, with bright blue designating halberdiers, royal purple for greatswords, burnished silver for longbows, forest green for lancers and amber gold for cataphracts.

The black crosses show the number of battles the company has been involved in and the red "T's" mark out over how many different campaigns those battle took place. The symbols in the lower left and right are distinguished service marks, recognising particularly bold feats of heroism of which most noteworthy is the green laurel Wreath of Exceptional Valour which shows that, at some point in its history, the company stood firm and unbroken and was annihilated to the last man with the standard being subsequently recovered. To be a new recruit or a transfer reforming such a company is both a great honour and a great weight upon one's shoulders: are you capable of such a triumph should the time come?
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 4: Signaller

#19 Post by Technic[Bot] » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:04 am

Well i guess my sight is worse by the day. No matter how much i zoom i cannot read what the horn says.

Also is it just met, the perspective, or their swords are a bit short?
In any case interesting piece as usual. Love the latin touch you give to the ranks and some of the names. Thought you may want to add a "glosary" with a few straightforward translations, for the curious reader who can't speak latin, specially if a google search won't return anything.
By the way now you got me hyped for the greatswordmen and the cataphracts.
In any case I am curious If a company is completely routed. How can the upper management tell if it was because they "stood their ground valiantly to the very last man" and not because they were stupid? Also there is a cross thing on the opposite side of the wreath are we ever gonna know what that means?



On a side note, these are pretty detailed description you are giving. Are you a history student or similar? You seem to know your stuff
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 4: Signaller

#20 Post by Thallium » Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:25 am

Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:04 am
Well i guess my sight is worse by the day. No matter how much i zoom i cannot read what the horn says.
Yeah I think that's an issue with the down scaling. From my perspective in the raw file at glorious 4K resolution it's very clear but at 720x1280 which is what FA scales them to it is quite blurry. I'll give you a hint, it's a simple substitution cipher using viking runes.
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:04 am
Also is it just met, the perspective, or their swords are a bit short?
In any case interesting piece as usual. Love the latin touch you give to the ranks and some of the names. Thought you may want to add a "glosary" with a few straightforward translations, for the curious reader who can't speak latin, specially if a google search won't return anything.
Perspective is one of the things I struggled most with during these pieces and I still mostly haven't got. I bloody nailed it for the marine's sword but just couldn't get it to work for the signaller's so yeah it's not great. As I'm developing this, I'm finding more and more that a combination of modern and Roman terminology works the best with basitins so expect more of that in the images to come. On that note, I can't speak latin although I do appreciate the aesthetic of the language (warhammer 40K ftw) so things like Magno Audientium is just what I get out of putting words into google translate until it spits out something I like (in this case "great speaker"). If lots more stuff like this comes up, I might add it to a list like you suggest, for world building.
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:04 am
By the way now you got me hyped for the greatswordmen and the cataphracts.
All of the additional unit types mentioned in that narrative will be making an appearance, a little teaser of what's to come. The cataphract especially was an exercise in "how much armour can I get on this horse...".
Technic[Bot] wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:04 am
In any case I am curious If a company is completely routed. How can the upper management tell if it was because they "stood their ground valiantly to the very last man" and not because they were stupid? Also there is a cross thing on the opposite side of the wreath are we ever gonna know what that means?

On a side note, these are pretty detailed description you are giving. Are you a history student or similar? You seem to know your stuff
The valour wreath presupposes that the entire army didn't get obliterated (that's a separate sigil) and so someone saw what happened to the company in question. Besides, even if they were stupid and got caught out of position, standing your ground in face of certain death is still something to be remembered for, even if the commander responsible is not looked on so favourably. I had ideas for all the symbols but things were getting long in the description and I didn't want to just talk symbology all day so I cut it out. The cross stands for a company which has had an alumnus make it to the top of the military hierarchy: the high generals, recognising where they got their start. In the case of the XIV Shieldbearer company, that alumnus was the late intelligence general Alabaster.

I am a scientist, not a history student, although I do very much appreciate history as a kind of hobby to pursue. The reason these are so detailed is because I have been world building these guys in my mind for a very long time, like since 2010 when I started writing my basitin-filled "novel" The Art of War (shameless plug, link in my signature). Hence I've had plenty of time to flesh out the details.

Also, the special project I mentioned before is definitely happening and once this thread gets to 500 views I'll give you a little teaser of it, so tell your friends!
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Re: The Basitin Military: An Illustrated Guide - Part 4: Signaller

#21 Post by Technic[Bot] » Wed Apr 18, 2018 4:08 am

Thallium wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:25 am

Perspective is one of the things I struggled most with during these pieces and I still mostly haven't got. I bloody nailed it for the marine's sword but just couldn't get it to work for the signaller's so yeah it's not great. As I'm developing this, I'm finding more and more that a combination of modern and Roman terminology works the best with basitins so expect more of that in the images to come. On that note, I can't speak latin although I do appreciate the aesthetic of the language (warhammer 40K ftw) so things like Magno Audientium is just what I get out of putting words into google translate until it spits out something I like (in this case "great speaker"). If lots more stuff like this comes up, I might add it to a list like you suggest, for world building.
I have not much artistic skill but i do know a thing or two about perspective geometry. For the characters themselves it does not matter much as they are not very "deep" so the foreshortening is negligible. In case of any straight thing, like swords spears, reactangular shields their geometry makes the perspective effect more noticeable. For that you can remember that every parallel line must intersect at some point, because that is how our eyes work, you can use one vanishing point or for your case two would be better. If you need further resources on perspective for artistic purposes you should consult architectonical drawing manuals, they deal with that stuff.
Thallium wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:25 am
All of the additional unit types mentioned in that narrative will be making an appearance, a little teaser of what's to come. The cataphract especially was an exercise in "how much armour can I get on this horse...".
Also, the special project I mentioned before is definitely happening and once this thread gets to 500 views I'll give you a little teaser of it, so tell your friends!
All aboard the Hype Train/horse! (horse armour DLC anyone?)
Thallium wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:25 am
I am a scientist, not a history student, although I do very much appreciate history as a kind of hobby to pursue. The reason these are so detailed is because I have been world building these guys in my mind for a very long time, like since 2010 when I started writing my basitin-filled "novel" The Art of War (shameless plug, link in my signature). Hence I've had plenty of time to flesh out the details.
Wow a scientist. We need more of those these days. Sorry for the misrepresentation, you struck me as someone with a history major for some reason. Again sorry for that.
In any case i have been meaning to read some of the stuff on the writers corner of the forum, it seems this place attracts people with good writing skills, again something i lack. Besides your novel sees like the kind of fiction i enjoy. Yet i haven't got the time to do it and besides the Forums archaic interface is really not suited for long reading sessions...
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